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27.06.2019    10:00

THURSDAY, 27.06.2019

10.00 – Yiddish folk songs of Mordechai Gebirtig (Part 1); Cindy Paley (US)

Workshop
Place: Galicia Jewish Museum, Dajwór 18
EN, PL
Tickets: 15 PLN
Organised by Beit Polska – The Union of Progressive Jewish Communities in Poland & Or Hadasz – The Progressive Jewish Community of Krakow.

Mordechai Gebirtig was a true folk poet and the most popular creator of hundreds of folk songs in Poland between the two world wars. Gebirtig’s songs were known and sung during his lifetime throughout the entire Yiddish cultural world. Collectively, they may be viewed as a representative voice of a major part of that lost world of European Jewish life and Yiddish culture.


12.00 - Chris Schwarz Memorial Lecture: Re-Generation. The Photographic Portrait of Polish Jews. 1975–2018; Chuck Fishman (US)

Lecture/presentation
Galicia Jewish Museum, ul. Dajwór 18
EN, PL
Free admission
Organized by: Galicia Jewish Museum

Chuck Fishman will give a lecture on his travels to Poland and his photography project that has continued for over four decades and is devoted to Polish Jews. The unique photographs by Fishman made in the 1970s and 1980s as well as the photographs made by him in the last decade created Re-Generation, an exhibition presented at the Galicia Jewish Museum. This project is a unique testimony to the duration and rebirth of Jewish life in Poland


13.00 – On (Jewish) Poland: Polish-Jewish relations in foreign press; Christian Davies (EN), Marcin Makowski (PL), led by Daniel Tilles (EN)

Discussion
Galicia Jewish Museum, ul. Dajwór 18
EN,PL
Free admission
Organized by: Galicia Jewish Museum

Over the last 18 months, Polish-Jewish relations have gone through their most challenging period in recent history, with decades of progress in building bridges between the two sides appearing to have been undone by bitter disputes over conflicting narratives of Second World War history and mutual accusations of anti-Semitism and Polonophobia, led by the two countries' governments.
How have these issues been covered by international media and perceived by the international community? What role can those media and community play in stirring up or resolving such disputes? And how do such issues affect Poland's standing in the world?

Particpants:

  • Christian Davies, foreign correspondent based in Warsaw for the Guardian and Observer newspapers. A regular columnist for Polish newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza, he has also written for Foreign Policy, Politico Europe, the New Statesman and Tablet Magazine.
  • Marcin Makowski, journalist of the weekly 'Do Rzeczy'. Historian and philosopher. He deals with topics from the borderline of media, politics and history. Publisher of Wirtualna Polska, collaborator of Dziennik Gazeta Prawna - former publisher on the Deon portal. He wrote to Onet, Forward, "Rzeczpospolita", "Tygodnik Powszechny" and Stacja7. He runs the "Nocna Zmiana" program on Radio Kraków.

Discussion led by:
Daniel Tilles, assistant professor of history at the Pedagogical University of Kraków. His research interests include immigration, politics (in particular fascism and the far right), racism and antisemitism, and Jewish history. Co-editor of the Notes From Poland internet portal, and has published texts in, among others, “Foreign Policy” and “Haaretz”.


16.00 – On (Jewish) Poland: Through the American Lens; Chuck Fishman (US), Jason Francisco (US), Ruth Ellen Gruber (US), Tomasz Strug (PL)

Discussion
Galicia Jewish Museum, Dajwór 18
EN,PL
Free admission
Organized by: Galicia Jewish Museum

Chuck Fishman made his first pictures of Polish Jews in 1975. His newest—probably a few moments ago. Jason Francisco came here for the first time in 1999. Since then he has been returning regularly and working on countless photography projects devoted primarily to the issues of the Holocaust and historical memory. They are both Americans, and their photographic portfolios are largely devoted to Poland—not only to its Jewish aspect.
What changed here during all those years? How the experience of working in Poland affected the photographers themselves. Why did they decide to come here in the first place and why are they still coming back?


16.00 - About Polish Jews. Opening the Drawer: The hidden Identities; Barry Cohen (EN), Witold Krassowski (PL), moderator: Jakub Nowakowski

Discussion
Galicia Jewish Museum, Dajwór 18
EN
Free admission
Organized by: Galicia Jewish Museum

In his book Opening the Drawer: The hidden identities of Polish Jews, Barry Cohen presents over 50 profiles of three generations of Poles who in a variety of ways discovered Their Jewish roots or background. They include child survivors of the Holocaust, Second Generation born after the war and often children of Jewish Communists or leftists, and Third Generation born after the fall of Communism. Their reconnection to some version of a Jewish identity has contributed to the revival of Jewish life in Poland and raises a number of key issues concerning the future of Polish Jewry.

Each profile is illustrated by photos taken by Witold Krassowski, one of Poland's most renowned photographers. A lengthy foreword, contributed by Antony Polonsky, the outstanding scholar of Polish Jewish history and chief historian of th Polin Musem in Warsaw, puts the social and historical background into a broader context.


18.00 - Czarne in Galicia: “The Children Did Not Cry: The Story of My Uncle, Alfred Trzebiński, an SS Doctor” Natalia Budzyńska (PL), moderated by: Aleksander Gurgul (PL)

Book promotion and meeting with the author
Galicia Jewish Museum, ul. Dajwór 18
PL
Free admission
Organized by: Galicia Jewish Museum, Czarne Publishing Press

“For us, the citizens of Mühlberg, it is beyond understanding, how a human being can be such a criminal,” wrote the former patients of his to the war tribunal in Hamburg. Because it was him, their “benefactor of humanity”, their doctor, who could spend a night at the ill person's bed, who bought medicine for the poor and supported them financially. 
Doctor Alfred Trzebinski was of the “majorly Nordic” race. Convinced of the uniqueness of German blood he joined the SS in 1932 and a year later became a member of the NSDAP, forgetting the Polish background of his father. In 1941 he became a doctor at Auschwitz, and, later, at Majdanek, and, finally, at Neuengamme. In 1946 the war tribunal sentenced him to death by hanging. The tribunal was schocked by Trzebinski's participation in the execution of 20 Jewish children aged from 6 to 12. The children might have survived, but they were hanged before the camp was liberated in order to hide the fact that for the last months they were undergoing cruel medical experiments.
Natalia Budzyńska in her story on Alfred Trzebinski makes an effort to confront the family mystery. By reading the diary of her uncle, the SS-man, she also is trying to understand how a successful doctor full of empathy made a career in concentration camps. The author of this difficult and emotional journey asks about the role of “good people in evil times,” about the freedom of choice and how easy we resign from it. Most of all, she brings the memory of the murdered children, the silent, almost forgotten victims.

19.00 - The Name's Bajgelman (PL), Ola Bilińska (PL)

Concert
Galicia Jewish Museum, ul. Dajwór 18
Tickets: 30 PLN, 50 PLN (available at the Jewish Culture Festival office or online, click here
Organized by: Jewish Culture Festival Association

Ola Bilińska and the musicians from the Libelid project pay a musical tribute to the Bajgelman family, who significantly influenced the musical landscape of pre-war Łódź.
Dawid and Chaim (later Henry) Bajgelman are the two most prominent members of the musical clan and a concert at the Jewish Culture Festival will be devoted to their music.

Dawid Bajgelman was an extremely versatile person: a violinist and violist, a conductor, composer and songwriter. He conducted the Łódź Symphony Orchestra and the orchestra of the Jewish Icchok ZandbergTheatre, he composed music for many theatres all over Poland and conducted their orchestras, he recorded albums for Syrena-Electro, but became famous as the author of the music for the performance of The Dybbuk by S. Anski, which became an international theatre hit. During the war, he founded and conducted a 44-member symphony orchestrain the Łódź Ghetto.

Chaim Bajgelman was a violinist, saxophonist and composer and the only one out of nine musical siblings to survive the war. He played professionally since the age of fifteen. He was a member of a family band, The Jolly Boys, which he revived in post-war Germany under the name The Happy Boys, playing jazz concerts for American soldiers and Jewish survivors. After the war, he emigrated to New York, where he continued his musical activities with The Happy Boys.

Ola Bilińska and her band have arranged the songs of both brothers to suit the 21st century: pre-war songs, lullabies and fragments of theatre music now include the sampler, analogue synthesisers and electronic vocal effects. In the foreground, however, are the beloved instruments of both brothers: the violin and viola, played by Zulia Ziętek, known for her cooperation with alternative scene musicians such as Maciej Cieślak (Ścianka), Monika Brodka, and Mitch and Mitch. The whole will be supplemented by the sound of two other unusual string instruments, the cello and the harp. The works of the Bajgelman brothers will be heardat the JCF in a modern slightly romantic acoustic-electronic version.

Ola Bilińska, Edyta Czerniewicz, Julia Ziętek, Kasia Kolbowska, Sebastian Witkowski